Boil Water Advisory for Castle Pines

June 10, 2021 at 12:25 pm

Attention Castle Pines businesses and residents, the Water Quality Control Division (WQCD) of the Colorado Public Health & Environment (CDPHE) has directed the Castle Pines North Metro District (CPNMD) to issue a boil advisory. Please click here to read the FINAL BOIL ADVISORY.

Here are a few key things to note:

  • DO NOT DRINK THE WATER WITHOUT BOILING IT FIRST.
  • Bring all water to a boil, let it boil for one (1) minute, and let it cool before using, or use bottled water.
  • DO NOT BOIL for an extensive period of time. MORE IS NOT BETTER.
  • Boiled or bottled water should be used for drinking, making ice, brushing teeth, washing dishes, and food preparation until further notice. Boiling kills bacteria and other organisms in the water.

Please continue to follow the City on social media and sign up for our e-news for continued updates. We will be sure to let people know when this advisory is lifted once we receive the official notification. The City is receiving all public information from Castle Pines North Metro District, Tri County Health Dept. and CDPHE and are eager to publish the public information as soon as we have it.

You may commence outdoor irrigation but the Elk Ridge Park Splash Pad and bathrooms will remain closed until further notice.

FAQ's from CDPHE regarding the Boil Water Advisory:

How long has the system been impacted?
On Tuesday afternoon June 8, Castle Pines North Metropolitan District’s chlorine injector stopped working. Castle Pines North secured an alternate water supply, but the pumping infrastructure malfunctioned and water pressure was lost the morning of June 9. That morning, Castle Pines North observed that a pressure loss impacted a significant portion of the area. The system notified CDPHE of the situation on the afternoon of June 9. CDPHE assessed the situation and informed Castle Pines North that they needed to tell the public to boil their water or use bottled water that evening. Castle Pines North was then required to issue public notice as soon as possible but no later than 24 hours after receiving that directive from CDPHE. Castle Pines North met that requirement by issuing the public notice on June 10.

CDPHE does not have direct evidence that water is contaminated, but they believe the risk of contamination started June 9 when there was a loss of pressure. That's why the boil water notice was issued.

CDPHE recognizes that there is elapsed time between when the event began to when notice was issued. This happens because it takes some time to gather information, assess the contamination risk, and issue the notice. Boil water notices represent a disruption to normal functioning in a community, so they are issued after a careful consideration of the circumstances and risk.

I drank water on June 9th, what should I do? 
We do not have direct evidence that any water contamination occurred in Castle Pines North Metropolitan District, but a loss of water pressure can lead to contamination. That is why the boil water notice was issued.

Loss of water pressure can allow disease-causing organisms to enter the water system. These organisms include bacteria, viruses, and parasites, which can cause symptoms such as nausea, cramps, diarrhea, and headaches. If you notice any of these symptoms, we recommend you seek medical advice.

Why is low water pressure a health concern? How does boiling water help?
Loss of water pressure can allow disease-causing organisms to enter the water system. These organisms include bacteria, viruses, and parasites, which can cause symptoms such as nausea, cramps, diarrhea, and headaches. Boiling kills bacteria and other organisms that may be in the water. While the boil water advisory is in effect, boiled or bottled water should be used for drinking, making ice, brushing teeth, washing dishes - including running your dishwasher, and food preparation. It is the general practice of the department to issue boil water notices for large scale pressure loss events.